There was a time when I believed in giants – the reality of their existence, if not now then within human memory. Same could be said for fairies, trolls, dwarves and the inhabitants of my childhood stories – and then I put them away, relegated to fantasy.

This is no longer the case. The evidence for giants having existed is littered throughout newspaper reports from the 1800’s of skeletons discovered, only to then have the physical evidence disappear.

Begs the question – ‘Why?’ Begs the further question – ‘Who benefits?’

If I mention corruption all know what it is I mean. If I add the word theory to make the phrase ‘corruption theory’ the phrase is both absurd and laughable yet conspiracy – accepted by all until recent times as equally a reality as corruption – now is rarely seen without the dreaded word ‘theory’ added. It’s absurd and laughable and accepted without question. Not by me. The same questions arise.

‘There are no small parts, only small actors’ is quoted by directors trying to fill the small roles in a play. It’s true and I tried to bring that sensibility into the small roles I had, decades ago, within the play, ‘The Life of Galileo.’

Galileo is being questioned by the religious authorities of the day for daring to suggest ideas contrary to accepted wisdom. This is a life and death matter for Galileo and, for me, having the small role as the one doing the questioning – how do I find the mentality of such a man? ‘My’ life is ruled by dogma, constrained by belief, utterly devoid of Christ’s injunction to ‘love your neighbour’ and ‘Do unto others as you’d have done to yourself’ – ideas far too revolutionary if the power of the Church is threatened.

I’d be shocked, angered, unwilling to look at the evidence because, BECAUSE …. ‘The Bible says …. and you, Galileo, are daring to suggest that the Bible is WRONG.’

I don’t know that I was a very good actor. The man whose part I played would not have seen himself as a bigot, more a soldier for God, a weapon using righteous anger to destroy both Galileo and his telescopic instrument. The work of the Devil.

All that took place hundreds of years ago and nothing much has changed. ‘Cancel culture’ – whether political or social - shuts down debate, reduces discussion to slogans of derision and does its best to keep creating a continuing climate of confusion and fear.

Mysticism, the Other … that which is not materialism. We wouldn’t have words such as mysticism, spirituality, intuition, if direct experience didn’t call them into being. There’s comfort in that.

While the world continues to lurch and stagger its way into some uncertain future I’ve had the opportunity and time to delve into the past, to British history in particular, world history by association and to the understanding that Velikovsky and others have concluded – that the timeline of history is skewed. I’m not sure of the wider implications of this but it dovetails nicely into the deliberate destruction of a British history, accepted until the 1700’s but not suitable for the political ends of a recent, uncertain royal dynasty on the British throne.

I’d know none of this but for the research of others. And the context they bring.

Somehow this brings me back to giants. Why such a subject should provoke a response where ‘destroy or hide the evidence’ is seen as acceptable is beyond me. What difference does it make whether giants existed or not. Life goes on. We’re not talking about monks of a thousand years ago copying, perhaps changing or outright destroying ancient manuscripts because they don’t conform to church dogma, in effect, changing, rearranging history … this is conscious, modern activity within my great grandfathers lifetime.

It beggars belief and belief is both the prism and the problem when it comes to history.

I’m rambling somewhat. Where such questions as ‘Are we alone in the Universe?’ - which I’ve established to my own satisfaction that we aren’t -  mattered to me, to my father it was a matter of some irritation when I raised it …. ‘What difference does it make? I’ll still have to catch the 7.35 bus to work.’

An inadequate response but … good to keep a sense of humour.

I don’t know what he’d have made of Yowie reports here in Australia. Too many to be ‘tall tales’ and given the vast forests in which to roam, yet another of life’s mysteries worth exploration.

 

 

There was a time when I believed in giants – the reality of their existence, if not now then within human memory. Same could be said for fairies, trolls, dwarves and the inhabitants of my childhood stories – and then I put them away, relegated to fantasy.

This is no longer the case. The evidence for giants having existed is littered throughout newspaper reports from the 1800’s of skeletons discovered, only to then have the physical evidence disappear.

Begs the question – ‘Why?’ Begs the further question – ‘Who benefits?’

If I mention corruption all know what it is I mean. If I add the word theory to make the phrase ‘corruption theory’ the phrase is both absurd and laughable yet conspiracy – accepted by all until recent times as equally a reality as corruption – now is rarely seen without the dreaded word ‘theory’ added. It’s absurd and laughable and accepted without question. Not by me. The same questions arise.

‘There are no small parts, only small actors’ is quoted by directors trying to fill the small roles in a play. It’s true and I tried to bring that sensibility into the small roles I had, decades ago, within the play, ‘The Life of Galileo.’

Galileo is being questioned by the religious authorities of the day for daring to suggest ideas contrary to accepted wisdom. This is a life and death matter for Galileo and, for me, having the small role as the one doing the questioning – how do I find the mentality of such a man? ‘My’ life is ruled by dogma, constrained by belief, utterly devoid of Christ’s injunction to ‘love your neighbour’ and ‘Do unto others as you’d have done to yourself’ – ideas far too revolutionary if the power of the Church is threatened.

I’d be shocked, angered, unwilling to look at the evidence because, BECAUSE …. ‘The Bible says …. and you, Galileo, are daring to suggest that the Bible is WRONG.’

I don’t know that I was a very good actor. The man whose part I played would not have seen himself as a bigot, more a soldier for God, a weapon using righteous anger to destroy both Galileo and his telescopic instrument. The work of the Devil.

All that took place hundreds of years ago and nothing much has changed. ‘Cancel culture’ – whether political or social - shuts down debate, reduces discussion to slogans of derision and does its best to keep creating a continuing climate of confusion and fear.

Mysticism, the Other … that which is not materialism. We wouldn’t have words such as mysticism, spirituality, intuition, if direct experience didn’t call them into being. There’s comfort in that.

While the world continues to lurch and stagger its way into some uncertain future I’ve had the opportunity and time to delve into the past, to British history in particular, world history by association and to the understanding that Velikovsky and others have concluded – that the timeline of history is skewed. I’m not sure of the wider implications of this but it dovetails nicely into the deliberate destruction of a British history, accepted until the 1700’s but not suitable for the political ends of a recent, uncertain royal dynasty on the British throne.

I’d know none of this but for the research of others. And the context they bring.

Somehow this brings me back to giants. Why such a subject should provoke a response where ‘destroy or hide the evidence’ is seen as acceptable is beyond me. What difference does it make whether giants existed or not. Life goes on. We’re not talking about monks of a thousand years ago copying, perhaps changing or outright destroying ancient manuscripts because they don’t conform to church dogma, in effect, changing, rearranging history … this is conscious, modern activity within my great grandfathers lifetime.

It beggars belief and belief is both the prism and the problem when it comes to history.

I’m rambling somewhat. Where such questions as ‘Are we alone in the Universe?’ - which I’ve established to my own satisfaction that we aren’t -  mattered to me, to my father it was a matter of some irritation when I raised it …. ‘What difference does it make? I’ll still have to catch the 7.35 bus to work.’

An inadequate response but … good to keep a sense of humour.

I don’t know what he’d have made of Yowie reports here in Australia. Too many to be ‘tall tales’ and given the vast forests in which to roam, yet another of life’s mysteries worth exploration.

 

 

There was a time when I believed in giants – the reality of their existence, if not now then within human memory. Same could be said for fairies, trolls, dwarves and the inhabitants of my childhood stories – and then I put them away, relegated to fantasy.

This is no longer the case. The evidence for giants having existed is littered throughout newspaper reports from the 1800’s of skeletons discovered, only to then have the physical evidence disappear.

Begs the question – ‘Why?’ Begs the further question – ‘Who benefits?’

If I mention corruption all know what it is I mean. If I add the word theory to make the phrase ‘corruption theory’ the phrase is both absurd and laughable yet conspiracy – accepted by all until recent times as equally a reality as corruption – now is rarely seen without the dreaded word ‘theory’ added. It’s absurd and laughable and accepted without question. Not by me. The same questions arise.

‘There are no small parts, only small actors’ is quoted by directors trying to fill the small roles in a play. It’s true and I tried to bring that sensibility into the small roles I had, decades ago, within the play, ‘The Life of Galileo.’

Galileo is being questioned by the religious authorities of the day for daring to suggest ideas contrary to accepted wisdom. This is a life and death matter for Galileo and, for me, having the small role as the one doing the questioning – how do I find the mentality of such a man? ‘My’ life is ruled by dogma, constrained by belief, utterly devoid of Christ’s injunction to ‘love your neighbour’ and ‘Do unto others as you’d have done to yourself’ – ideas far too revolutionary if the power of the Church is threatened.

I’d be shocked, angered, unwilling to look at the evidence because, BECAUSE …. ‘The Bible says …. and you, Galileo, are daring to suggest that the Bible is WRONG.’

I don’t know that I was a very good actor. The man whose part I played would not have seen himself as a bigot, more a soldier for God, a weapon using righteous anger to destroy both Galileo and his telescopic instrument. The work of the Devil.

All that took place hundreds of years ago and nothing much has changed. ‘Cancel culture’ – whether political or social - shuts down debate, reduces discussion to slogans of derision and does its best to keep creating a continuing climate of confusion and fear.

Mysticism, the Other … that which is not materialism. We wouldn’t have words such as mysticism, spirituality, intuition, if direct experience didn’t call them into being. There’s comfort in that.

While the world continues to lurch and stagger its way into some uncertain future I’ve had the opportunity and time to delve into the past, to British history in particular, world history by association and to the understanding that Velikovsky and others have concluded – that the timeline of history is skewed. I’m not sure of the wider implications of this but it dovetails nicely into the deliberate destruction of a British history, accepted until the 1700’s but not suitable for the political ends of a recent, uncertain royal dynasty on the British throne.

I’d know none of this but for the research of others. And the context they bring.

Somehow this brings me back to giants. Why such a subject should provoke a response where ‘destroy or hide the evidence’ is seen as acceptable is beyond me. What difference does it make whether giants existed or not. Life goes on. We’re not talking about monks of a thousand years ago copying, perhaps changing or outright destroying ancient manuscripts because they don’t conform to church dogma, in effect, changing, rearranging history … this is conscious, modern activity within my great grandfathers lifetime.

It beggars belief and belief is both the prism and the problem when it comes to history.

I’m rambling somewhat. Where such questions as ‘Are we alone in the Universe?’ - which I’ve established to my own satisfaction that we aren’t -  mattered to me, to my father it was a matter of some irritation when I raised it …. ‘What difference does it make? I’ll still have to catch the 7.35 bus to work.’

An inadequate response but … good to keep a sense of humour.

I don’t know what he’d have made of Yowie reports here in Australia. Too many to be ‘tall tales’ and given the vast forests in which to roam, yet another of life’s mysteries worth exploration.